Grading Practices

Grading Practices Infographic by Adam Brock

Grading Practices Infographic by Adam Brock

*Follow this link for more info.

In my pre-internship experience I saw two very different styles of grading for math courses in the same school. In one situation, students were required to complete practice problems for each section, mark it on their own, and tell the teacher their mark. Each assignment would be included in their final grade. Since there were so many assignments, individual assignments were not heavily weighted. About once a semester, the teacher would randomly select a previous assignment to be handed in and corrected by the teacher to ensure that the students deserved that mark. The other teacher used textbook questions as a way to practice the material instead of being graded on them and used hand-in assignments for marks less often.

After reading the article, provided in the link above, I can see positives and negatives to both of these grading strategies. A combination of these two methods may give you a better understanding of student achievement. If you gave students both practice questions and an assignment for grading each week, leading up to a unit test, students would be aware of their progress along the way and you would be able to support students who may be struggling with the material because you would know what their current skills were. It would also be beneficial to provide different types of assignments, especially in mathematics, where students could show me their strengths in other subject areas but in a math context such as through projects.

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About Adam Brock

My name is Adam Brock and I am a third year student at the University of Regina! I am currently in the Secondary Education Program, with plans to major in Mathematics and minor in Outdoor and Physical Education. I was born and raised in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada and look forward to travelling after my years at the U of R.

Posted on April 13, 2015, in Education Core Studies (ECS) 350, Topics Of Interest and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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