Direct Instruction

Direct instruction is a tried and tested model that works! It is important for students to understand why they learning something or what they will get from the lesson. Explaining the goal of the lesson first makes sure that students will not be lost wondering about what the end result will be. Providing models and expectations for your students sets them up for success and should also cut down on students asking what they are supposed to do. Guiding students through the process gives them confidence in their learning so that they can become independent in the skill. However, alternative approaches to instruction should also be considered as direct instruction lacks engagement, creativity, and choice. This is just one teaching strategy that will not work for all of your students, but can be useful when used properly.

This video clearly outlines the How-Tos of direct instruction:

Step 1: Motivate students and build background knowledge

*remember to always use positive phrases when introducing new topics*

Step 2: Explain new skills they will learn

*explain purpose of the lesson* What will you be able to do at the end?

*break down the concept into steps* oral and visual for all students learning needs

Step 3: Model quality product

*Show students what you expect* Interactively involve them in modeling the concept.

Step 4: Provide guided practice

*Graphic organizer guides students* Release of responsibility: students become independent.

 

Advertisements

About Adam Brock

My name is Adam Brock and I am a third year student at the University of Regina! I am currently in the Secondary Education Program, with plans to major in Mathematics and minor in Outdoor and Physical Education. I was born and raised in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada and look forward to travelling after my years at the U of R.

Posted on April 12, 2015, in Education Core Studies (ECS) 350, Topics Of Interest and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: